Monthly Archives: August 2011

LINIARITY INTEGRAL

Square root of x formula. Symbol of mathematics.

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The collection of Riemann integrable functions on a closed interval [a, b] forms a vector space under the operations of pointwise addition and multiplication by a scalar, and the operation of integration

 f \mapsto \int_a^b f \; dx

is a linear functional on this vector space. Thus, firstly, the collection of integrable functions is closed under taking linear combinations; and, secondly, the integral of a linear combination is the linear combination of the integrals,

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LEBESGUE INTEGRAL

Up Riemann

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The Riemann integral is not defined for a wide range of functions and situations of importance in applications (and of interest in theory). For example, the Riemann integral can easily integrate density to find the mass of a steel beam, but cannot accommodate a steel ball resting on it. This motivates other definitions, under which a broader assortment of functions are integrable (Rudin 1987). The Lebesgue integral, in particular, achieves great flexibility by directing attention to the weights in the weighted sum.

The definition of the Lebesgue integral thus begins with a measure, μ. In the simplest case, the Lebesgue measure μ(A) of an interval A = [a,b] is its width, ba, so that the Lebesgue integral agrees with the (proper) Riemann integral when both exist. In more complicated cases, the sets being measured can be highly fragmented, with no continuity and no resemblance to intervals.

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RIEMANN INTEGRAL

The Riemann integral is defined in terms of Riemann sums of functions with respect to tagged partitions of an interval. Let [a,b] be a closed interval of the real line; then a tagged partition of [a,b] is a finite sequence

 a = x_0 \le t_1 \le x_1 \le t_2 \le x_2 \le \cdots \le x_{n-1} \le t_n \le x_n = b . \,\!

Riemann sums converging as intervals halve, whether sampled at ■ right, ■ minimum, ■ maximum, or ■ left.

This partitions the interval [a,b] into n sub-intervals [xi−1, xi] indexed by i, each of which is “tagged” with a distinguished point ti ∈ [xi−1, xi]. A Riemann sum of a function f with respect to such a tagged partition is defined as

\sum_{i=1}^{n} f(t_i) \Delta_i ;
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DELPHI 7

Beberapa teman-teman pembaca yang mungkin sedang kuliah delphi 7, ataupun teman-teman yang iseng ingin belajar delphi 7, atau apalah yang penting kalian sedang mencari master delphi 7, bisa nanti saling share. ..

  

Setelah mencari-cari, akhirnya menemukan master delphi yang pas untuk digunakan di windows 7. Meskipun begitu, dalam penginstallannya pun ternyata merepotkan.

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Reviewing the regularity theory of elliptics PDEs via the Laplace equation [Part III]

Vector Rotation

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Let us recall Green’s identity, if {u,v} are any functions smooth in {\bar{\Omega}} and {\Omega} is a bounded domain with smooth boundary we have

\displaystyle \int_\Omega u\Delta v - v \Delta u dx = \int_{\partial \Omega}u\frac{\partial v}{\partial \nu}-v\frac{\partial u}{\partial \nu}dS

this identity can be obtained with a couple of integration by parts involving the vector fields {u \nabla v} and {v \nabla u}.

Lets rewrite the identity as

\displaystyle \int_\Omega u\Delta vdx = -\int_\Omega v \Delta u dx + \int_{\partial \Omega}u\frac{\partial v}{\partial \nu}-v\frac{\partial u}{\partial \nu}dS

thus, at least formally, if somehow we could find for every {x \in \Omega} a function {v_x(y)} such that

\displaystyle \Delta v_x(y)=\delta_x(y)

\displaystyle  v_x(y) \equiv 0 \mbox{ on } \partial \Omega

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Reviewing the regularity theory of elliptics PDEs via the Laplace equation [Part II]

1 over x harmonic

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This is the second of a series of posts dealing with the regularity theory of elliptic equations. My motivation in writing these is outlined in the first post.

Some consequences of Harnack’s inequality the Mean value property

The mean value property is characteristic of harmonic functions, but the fact that harmonic functions control their pointwise values by their local average is a general fact that is characteristic of elliptic equations (as we will see later, less sharp but more general theorems for nonlinear elliptic equations still have this flavor and are at the very heart of the regularity theory of fully nonlinear elliptic PDEs). Let me mention a few of its consequences, I already talked last time about Harnack’s inequality, as it follows from the mean value theorem, the mean value theorem (at least for harmonic functions) is more fundamental.

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Reviewing the regularity theory of elliptics PDEs via the Laplace equation [Part I]

Membrane exampleA

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There is a tedious, simple but hopefully fruitful exercise I always wanted to do. It is to review all the different proofs of the Harnack inequality and regularity of solutions to elliptic equations that I know, but only for the Laplace equation. First, because it is a good way to really get your hands on some of the ideas of several deep theorems (like those of De Giorgi-Nash-Moser and Krylov-Safonov) in the simplest possible setting. Second, because looking at all the different proofs it is possible to trace the evolution of analysis and PDEs through the last century (and a bit before that) and appreciate the level maturity reached in several fields: potential theory, singular integrals, calculus of variations, fully non linear elliptic PDE and free boundary problems. The `simple’ and `elementary’ Laplace equation lies at the intersection of all these fields, so every new breakthrough reflected on our understanding of this equation, each new proof emphasizing a different approach or point of view. Each of the proofs that I will discuss are based on one of the following:

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